In Her Own Right

Rebecca Singer Collins Papers

Date created 1824-01-01 – 1886-01-01
Creators Rebecca Singer Collins (1804-1892)
Abstract While not about women's rights per se, Collins's writings show how religion pushed women to be involved in public life. Like her friend Dorothy Dix, Collins felt that she had a right and a duty to enter spaces like almshouses and prisons, ministering to both women and men. Papers also offer a glimpse of how an elite Quaker woman viewed prisoners, the poor, "women of immoral character" (her emphasis) and more.
Description Collins's main interlocutor was her husband; her letters to him largely concern religion, family, her and others' health, and her daily activities. The most interesting parts of this collection are diaries from the 1840s. While earlier writings focus on Collins's religious journey, later diaries describe her visits to prisons and almshouses in some detail, including descriptions of her interactions with prisoners. Visits include several trips to Blockley Almshouse, including one with Dorothy Dix , as well as to the Moral Reform Retreat for Coloured Women, Moyamensing Prison, the Magdalen Asylum, and the House of Refuge.
Research interest While not about women's rights per se, Collins's writings show how religion pushed women to be involved in public life. Like her friend Dorothy Dix, Collins felt that she had a right and a duty to enter spaces like almshouses and prisons, ministering to both women and men. Papers also offer a glimpse of how an elite Quaker woman viewed prisoners, the poor, "women of immoral character" (her emphasis) and more.
Size .5 lf
Geographical location
Full collection description Home repository description for Rebecca Singer Collins Papers
View full item http://library.haverford.edu/file-id-753
Contributing institution Haverford College Library, Quaker & Special Collections
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